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David didn’t invent the reed switch. But he spent 30 years perfecting it. He's engineered solutions for pacemakers, jumbo jets, and for products like submarines and the space station that push the boundaries of where we go and what we do next. No one else in the world has seen all he’s seen, and no one else loves putting that experience to work for you more than he does.

Posts by David

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Designing Sensors

I have been designing reed switches and proximity sensors to meet the needs of the multitude of applications that are out there for 40 years. The primary purpose of our sensors is to convert a mechanical motion to an electrical signal. The designs of these sensors can be very simple or really critical and complicated.

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Spot On the Most Magnetic Sensor

The new Spot-On sensor is designed like no other reed switch based proximity sensor.   There are sensor assemblies that feature internal magnets but none like this one.   

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Too Much Magnetism

There is often “too much magnetism” to make a reed switch or proximity sensor work the way it is desired. But there are solutions to these tricky problems.

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Thunder Thinking: How Innovation Happens at HSI

Brainstorm: The unrestrained offering of ideas or suggestions by all members of a committee in an effort to find a solution to a problem, generate a new solution or develop a new product. Here in Oklahoma, taking reference to our NBA team, I prefer to call it “Thunder Thinking.” HSI Sensing is widely known for … Continued

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Renovate Old Toys with Reed Switches

Being a reed switch nerd, I look at almost everything to see how a sensor and magnet might be utilized. As my grandchildren grow up their old toys slowly become obsolete. They are now boring, low tech and provide little stimulation or entertainment value. In our collection of toys are wooden trains, cars and trucks. … Continued

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The True Form B Reed Switch — How’d We Do That?

Recently the release of our HSR-376R — the world’s first true Form B reed switch — has been getting a lot of attention. And a lot of people have been asking how exactly it works and how it was developed. I’ll attempt to answer some of those questions here. In the past, we, like other … Continued

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First New Reed Switch In Over 50 Years

The reed switch was invented in1936 at Bell Laboratories. Nearly all reed switches work on the premise of an attractive force: An opposite polarity develops across a normally open contact. When the magnetism is sufficient this force overcomes the stiffness of the reed blades, and the contact pulls together. This same attractive force operates SPDT … Continued

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A new solution to an old application

The world is full of mechanisms, machines and devices with moving parts. Many of these “old” pieces of equipment or technology have mechanical switches converting mechanical motions into electrical signals. Often those mechanical switches get dirty, the contacts have aged, or there are new requirements for environmental safety or switch longevity or performance. There is … Continued

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A New Solution to an Old Application

The world is full of mechanisms, machines and devices with moving parts. Many of these “old” pieces of equipment or technology have mechanical switches converting mechanical motions into electrical signals. Often those mechanical switches get dirty, the contacts have aged, or there are new requirements for environmental safety or switch longeviety or performance. There is … Continued